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ROAMING GRAFFITI WALL PROTEST PIECE – COMMONWEALTH GAMES 2006

August 20, 2008

We have a special addition to our auction, by physical graffiti artists WORKMAN JONES (they use their bodies..a different kind of political street art practiced during the day) who created the stencil protest as a work that paid homage to Melbourne’s stencil artists.

It is a collection of 5 canvases that made up the roaming wall of graffiti – a pro street art campaign that challenged the City of Melbourne’s zero tolerance policy during the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

The roaming wall, made up of 5 canvases covered in photographs of stencils from around Melbourne, was taken to the streets in a political protest against the City of Melbourne during the 2006 Commonwealth Games, who spent thousands of dollars painting over the top of Melbourne’s vibrant collection of street art in the lead up to this global event, to present the city in a way that reflected the unrealistic and dichotomous ideology of a consumer driven society free from diversity, issues, problems, homelessness, poverty, art – life.

FUSION 2008 is proud to offer the original panels from the protest. Please note- this collection is a protest piece made up from images taken of stencils on the streets of Melbourne. The artists who’s work was photographed for the protest did not stencil their work onto these canvases.

This is the only piece in the auction that is not the original work of the stencil artist themselves, and is in the auction due to its political fabulousness for supporting freedom of expression and the street art movement.

Each piece of the roaming wall will be auctioned off individually.

Bio

Patrick Jones is an activist, street artist, heirloom vegetable grower and writer working towards a post-industrialised form of poetry. He lives in Djadjawurrung country north of Melbourne. His article on privatised bottled water appears in the latest issue of D!SSENT magazine and his book, ‘A Free-dragging Manifesto: how to do words with things’, is about to be launched at the 2008 Melbourne Writers Festival.

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